Gina Yannitell Reinhardt Ph.d.

Speaking

“Competing for the Platform: The Politics of Interest Group Influence on Political Party Platforms.” 2009. With Jennifer Nicoll Victor.

Presented At:

The American Political Science Association Meeting in Toronto, Ontario, and the Visions in Methodology Conference, Columbus, Ohio.

While parties view interest groups as a means to mobilize voters, interest groups view parties and their platforms as a means to articulate interests. We demonstrate the conditions under which parties will articulate an organized interest group’s preferred positions in its quadrennial platform. Utility functions illustrate that parties will reward groups that can mobilize voters, as evidenced by a group’s resources, loyalty to the party, and ideological similarity to the party status quo. We test these implications using content analysis on three years of DNC platforms and group testimony. Results show that parties reward loyal groups that are ideologically near the party, but that resources have no effect.

Presentation

“Giving and Receiving Foreign Aid: Does Conflict Count?” 2007. With Eliana Balla.

Presented At:

University of Birmingham Distinguished Lecture Series, Birmingham, England, and at the Institute of Social Sciences, the Hague, Netherlands.

Of what relative importance are strategic motivators for bilateral aid donors, and how important is a recipient’s geographic proximity to conflict relative to previously examined economic and political motivators? We find that donors have historically responded to balanced incentives to reduce recipient poverty and further donor political and economic goals. Every bilateral donor conditions aid on conflict. The United States allocates large amounts of development aid to countries bordering a conflict, both pre- and post-Cold War. However, controlling for development levels and donor economic and political interest, most donors reduce aid to a recipient with an in-house or nearby intense conflict.

Presentation

“Tipping and Cuing: Preference Formation and Information-Gathering post-Katrina and Rita.” 2006.

Presented At:

The American Political Science Association Conference in Philadelphia, PA, and at the National Science Foundation Principal Investigator’s Meeting in Washington, DC.

We use a survey to study how the revision of risk perceptions due to catastrophic events influences an individual’s probability of returning to or maintaining his/her place of residence. Some respondents are people who were directly affected by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita; others are people that live in areas that might be threatened by hurricanes in the future. Participants will be asked either about their real experiences or about hypothetical situations. The catastrophe, be it real or hypothetical, includes not only the hurricane itself, but also the shortsightedness of delaying or under-funding levee reconstruction, as well as the public administration failures in attempting to mitigate the hurricane’s damage. An efficient incentive system is one in which people who have the appetite for the risk select to stay in hurricane-threatened areas. In part this appetite may be influenced by perceptions of place. What is an efficient policy? Does an “economically efficient” policy have sociological implications? How will such a policy impact the socio-economic, cultural and racial make-up of a community?

Presentation

“Domestic Violence in Southern Europe: Does the Organizational Structure of NGOs Contribute to the Differences Among Nations?” 2005. With Celeste Montoya Kirk.

Presented At:

The Western Political Science Association Conference in Oakland, CA, and the American Political Science Association in Washington, D.C.

While the European Union’s role in Member States’ economic policy is fairly clear, its role in social policy is still questionable. On the record, Member States have created the requisite policies, ministries, and agencies pertaining to violence against women. Yet the implementation of these policies is not consistently regulated by the EU, nor does membership depend on it, and it has thus evolved in different manners in each state. In particular, Italy, Portugal, Spain, and Greece, despite conforming to EU standards, have experienced vast differences in the implementation and effects of policies regarding violence against women. What it is that causes the evolution of rights in one state to be so different from another, despite the top-down regulations imposed by the EU? It is our contention that policy implementation, while constrained by international norms and guidelines, is also the product of an intricate combination of national and organizational factors specific to each nation-state, as well as a web of transnational networks of advocacy coalitions. By synthesizing the literature on social movements, public policy, and bureaucratic organization, we suggest that while local cultures constrain policy implementation, variations in a movement’s focus, resources, and organizational constraints within their given societal context, along with their participation in advocacy networks, determine how and if policies are implemented, despite top-down regulation. This paper represents a preliminary research design of an extensive project begun in May 2004 on the implementation of policies regarding violence against women in Southern Europe. We present theoretical and historical context for the issue we intend to study, as well as a few descriptive statistics that serve as motivation.

Presentation

 

Other speaking engagements and invitations:

 
  • Race, Trust, and Return Migration: The Political Drivers of Post-Disaster Resettlement.” 2014.
  • “China’s Foreign Aid and Investment.” 2014. Chaired Panel At: American Political Science Association Conference, Washington, DC. I led a panel discussion on international financial institutions and foreign development assistance on August 29. Summary 
  • “More Power than You Think? Constituencies and Decision-Making Influences over Agency Output in EuropeAid.” 2014. Presented At: 7th Annual Conference on The Political Economy of International Organizations (PEIO), Princeton, NJ. I presented a paper on January 30 that examined incentives of bilateral and multilateral aid donors. Evidence indicates that bilateral aid from member states has not changed in delivery following the Paris Declaration, in which donors pledged to shift delivery to budget support. Summary
  • AidData Research Consortium. 2014. Convened At: AidData Center for Development Policy, Williamsburg, VA, January 8-11. I was selected to join a select group of scholars and policy-makers to conduct cutting-edge research on development issues that will support evidence-based policy and program decisions by practitioners sponsored by the United States Agency for International Development’s (USAID) Higher Education Solution Network (HESN.) Using geocoded data on project activities and sub-national development indicators, donors, governments and civil society stakeholders can monitor where aid is flowing relative to areas of need and opportunity. Summary
  • “Why Isn’t Development Assistance More Effective?  It’s Time to Ask.” 2013. . Presented At: International Political Economy Society (IPES), Claremont, CA. I presented work on foreign aid allocation and implementation effectiveness October 25-26. In the paper I urged aid and development scholars to catch up to policy makers’ current practices in foreign aid allocation, giving a theoretical grounding for a new paradigm in foreign aid scholarship and using the United States Agency for International Development as a test case. Summary
  • “Race, Trust, and Migration: The Politics of Post-Disaster Resettlement.” 2013. Delivered At: The Bush School of Government and Public Service in College Station, TX, September 22. Summary
  • “Trust, Disasters, and Federalism.” 2013. Presented At: American Political Science Association in Chicago, IL. I presented work revealing that trust in public officials changes depending on whether the officials operate at the local, state, or federal level. Summary
  • “Foreign Aid: What Are Its Effects?” 2013. Discussant At:Midwest Political Science Association Conference in Chicago, IL. I served as discussant on a panel, “Foreign Aid: What Are Its Effects?” April 11-14. Important new findings reveal that human rights abuses of aid recipients, previously found to be unimportant in determining aid allocation, do determine allocation if they are publicized by international non-governmental organizations. Summary